南京夜网,南京性息网,南京上门按摩论坛 Poword by Ircomp!

Welcome to my site.

Overpass is go

Sunday, 1 July, 2018

The approved route for the new road over rail overpass planned for Gunnedah.
Nanjing Night Net

Violeta Hiscock

Gunnedah’s second road over rail bridge will go ahead along the preferred route announced in August.

Minister for Roads and Freight Duncan Gay and Member for Tamworth Kevin Anderson has confirmed work would now start on development of the concept design and environmental approvals.

The route includes acquisition of at least two properties to allow the access to Barber Street requested by local businesses.

Once again, the news has come as a surprise to Barber Street resident Violeta Hiscock, whose house lies directly inthe path of the access route to Barber Street.

Mrs Hiscock was suprised to hear the house she has lived in for 20 years was in the way of the route when it was announced as the preferred option in August.

On Friday, she was just as surprised to learn the route had been confirmed.

She has not yet been made an offer on her house by Roads and Maritime Services

She said she does not want to move.

“Money means nothing to me,” Mrs Hiscock said.

“I still feel that way, honest to goodness.

“I am 63 years old and I do not want to start all over again. I am comfortable here. I walk around and I know people here, I trust people here and I have friends here.”

Roads and Maritime Services left a message for Mrs Hiscock the afternoon before Friday’s announcement, asking her to call them. She said she wanted to continue to fight the acquisition of her home.

The Gunnedah overpass will be built to allow easier movement of traffic around Gunnedah as coal trains become longer and more frequent and mean faster times for emergency services vehicles.

Mr Gay said the Gunnedah overpass was part of the NSW government’s $290 million Bridges for the Bush program.

“The preferred option will provide an unrestricted higher mass limit (HML) route through the town and maintain access to the Barber Street business precinct through an upgrade intersection,” Mr Gay said.

The route chosen is west of the Gunnedah Maize Mill and will connect the Oxley Highway with a new roundabout at the intersection of Conadilly and Warrabungle streets.

Gunnedah Shire Council mayor Owen Hasler said today council supported the option and was “eager to see the concept turn into reality particularly given the increased rail traffic on the line due to greater coal production in the area”.

“Council applauds the state government and Road and Maritime Services on the extensive community consultation undertaken during the conceptual and planning phase of the project and are pleased that modified Option C has been identified as the preferred option for the overpass development

“This development brings with it many benefits for the community such as improved accessibility, improved safety and the opportunity for considerable economic benefits with the commercial redevelopment of the western end of Gunnedah.

“However, due to the extremely complex nature of the site I wish to also acknowledge that some residents will be negatively impacted by the development and this is indeed regrettable.”

Mr Anderson said the preferred option – Option C – had been refined to include access to Barber Street.

“I’m pleased the recommended Option C for the second overpass of the railway line at Gunnedah identified in August is now the preferred option,” he said.

“The new route will replace the New Street level crossing, which will be closed.”

For more information, contact the project team on the toll free number 1800 029 585 or email [email protected]南京夜网. To view the preferred option visit www.rms.nsw.gov.au/roadprojects.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Nungatta visit

Sunday, 1 July, 2018

THE Bombala and District Historical Society held its spring excursion to Nungatta, Nungatta South and Wangabelle on Saturday, November 15.
Nanjing Night Net

Around 60 people made their way to Nungatta for morning tea where the President, Stuart Hood welcomed all and gave the group a history of settlement in Nungatta.

Mr Hood explained that when W.T. Morris squattered on 100,000 acres in the area in 1836, they found the aborigines in the area were outcasts from other tribes and were not aggressive like some of the aborigines further south.

There were a succession of owners each lasting three or four years until Alexander Weatherhead bought Nungatta in 1854 for 800 pounds.

It was now much reduced, about 12,000 acres. He later wrote that he was very happy there, he could eat when he was hungry, sleep when he was tired and work for the rest of the time.

He raised his family there, farmed it successfully and when he died in 1901 he left an estate worth 40,000 pounds.

Hector McWilliam (of McWilliams Wines) bought it from the estate in 1914 and unsuccessfully tried to subdivide it into dairy farms. He then sold it in 1918 to Henry Phippard, a Sydney builder (with his brother, Ernest, they had built the Queen Victoria Building), and built a large homestead on Nungatta.

However his attempt to run pigs was a failure, and in 1923 sold it to Traralgon graziers, Dunbar, Dunbar and Napier, who were later joined by David Walker, father of Alan Walker of Palarang. They successfully raised cattle, droving them to Traralgon to fatten them.

In 1946 they sold Nungatta to the Osbornes from Bungendore who used managers to run sheep and cattle. Gil McIntosh and Paul Gimbert were two of the managers in recent times.

Paul recounted some of his memories of his time at Nungatta. In 2013 Ben Campbell bought part of the property while James Osborne retained the south western portion.

The group then went and inspected the Homestead, which has fallen into disrepair, but it was evident that it had been a magnificent house when it was built.

Next was the woolshed where Keith Brownlie and John Podger, who had worked there during shearing, recalled some interesting incidents that had occurred.

Following lunch the group went to the cemetery where Alexander Weatherhead, some of his family and some workmen were buried, before continuing to South Nungatta.

South Nungatta was split off Nungatta in 1907 and run by Charles McCoy. Between 1919 and 1970 the Browns owned it and since 1972 the Nungatta South Group has owned it. They are a Melbourne Group who want to run it as a Conservation Reserve.

The group then proceeded to Wangabelle where Dot de Geus gave the history of Wangabelle from a thriving dairy community with a school of over 100 pupils to the present time where there are about 15 beef cattle farms.

The group also looked at the cemetery where descendants of the original settler Captain Stevenson are buried. Captain Stevenson himself is buried in Rockton.

This was the conclusion of a very successful day.

Nungatta visit TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Schoolies go for scenic alternative

Sunday, 1 July, 2018

Latrece De Thier of Logan, Elizabeth McNulty of Greenbank and Dale Sinkowski of Jimboomba enjoyed a peaceful Schoolies Week experience at Lake Moogerah.SCHOOL leavers are enjoying thepeace and quiet of the Scenic Rim as an alternative to the bright lights of Surfers Paradise for Schoolies Week.
Nanjing Night Net

Parklands Christian College graduates Latrece De Thier, Elizabeth McNulty, Dale Sinkowski and Josiah Gray have opted for a week of camping at Lake Moogerah to celebrate finishing year 12.

The group of friends, all 17, are swapping the popular Schoolies Week experience of alcohol and partying for waterskiing, mountain climbing, board games and football at Lake Moogerah.

Elizabeth said she and her friends decided to go camping at Lake Moogerah because they preferred the atmosphere there.

“It’s a lot more peaceful and it’s safer,” she said.

“It’s quiet here and it’s just easier to relax here with your best mates.”

Latrece said alcohol would not be a part of the group’s Schoolies experience.

“You just do stupid stuff when you have alcohol and we want to remember our time here,” she said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Editorial: Be bush fire ready

Monday, 16 September, 2019

MAKE a fire escape plan for all your family, prepare for bush fire season, take care when setting up Christmas lights and check the battery in your smoke alarm to make sure it is working.
Nanjing Night Net

These are all fire safety messages that have become commonplace in recent years.

They are invaluable messages that should never be overlooked, but despite this fact they are too often brushed to one side as something we will consider later.

But such complacency could mean the difference between life and death.

Right now is the time to be fire wise, regardless of whether you live in a bushland area or in suburbia.

In October 2013 alone bushfires destroyed 200 homes and resulted in two deaths as six blazes burned across eastern NSW.

And the threat of bush fires in NSW does not look like diminishing as we head in to the 2014/15 summer season.

All fire permits have been suspended in the Wingecarribee Shire from December 1 until further notice due to a forecast for hot, dry and windy conditions.

However, the threat of bush fire is not the only type of blaze that should concern people.

According to Australia’s leading smoke alarm specialist Smoke Alarms Australia one in two NSW households has a non-working smoke alarm, and nearly one in three households have no working smoke alarm at all.

Smoke Alarms Australia general manager Troy Thompson has warned that these statistics were particularly worrying during the festive season considering Christmas lights were the major household fire danger in summer.

With these facts in mind it would seem that there is no time like the present for all households to get fire wise. If you live near bushland then now is the time to make a bush fire plan and work to protect your property against a possible blaze.

Meanwhile, every household should check that they have working smoke alarms and a fire escape plan in place which can easily be understood by all the family.

For more details on fire safety visit ww.rfs.nsw.gov.au or www.fire.nsw.gov.au/page.php?id=81

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Letters to the editor, November 26

Monday, 16 September, 2019

New race rules no good
Nanjing Night Net

HAVING attended Bong Bong Picnic Races for the last 15 years with a lovely atmosphere and no trouble from fellow racegoers, I was very disappointed with the new rules and regulations pertaining to the purchase of alcohol.

It is not the aim to discourage over-consumption or misbehaviour I objected to – that is to be commended, but the way in which it was implemented.

To ban sales of bottled wine after 1 pm only resulted in a bun rush for the bar which resembled the old days of the “six o’clock swill”.

Some of the small group (5) I was with were not able to get to the races before 12.30 due to work committments and by the time we parked, had bags searched and walked to our spot it was almost 1 o’clock.

The queues at the bar on the roadside of the track were almost out to the front gate.

We didn’t bother joining them.

I estimated at least 50 per cent of the crowd were mature local residents who are quite capable of conducting themselves properly at an event which allows alcohol and it is a pity that we could not enjoy a couple of bottles of wine with our picnic.

At around 3.30 I went to the bar hoping to buy a cold G and T only to find everything had run out, with the exception of lite beer and the cheapest sparkling wine.

The day ended for us at 5.30 and on leaving the gates were subjected to a search of bags for alcohol again on the WAY OUT.

A very officious police woman confiscated a bottle of champagne from a woman going out in front of us.

Am I missing something here? With respect it sounds a bit like an Irish joke.

I know I risk being labelled alcohol dependent. Not the case, just can’t understand why we can’t buy a bottle of wine at an event such as this.

I notice the numbers were really down this year which is defeating the object of having the event on a Friday to attract more people (including visitors from Sydney who will make a weekend of it and spend money in the district.)

The Sydneysiders I spoke to couldn’t believe the archaic arrangements when trying to buy a bottle of wine.

Perhaps it could be better managed next year?

Ros Vidgen

Wildes Meadow

A friendly train trip

TRAVELLING down to Sydney last Friday on the train, I was reminded how our rail service has changed in the last few years.

The driver on the Campbelltown run, was on his final day, celebrating 39 years of service.

At the Bowral, Mittagong and Picton stations extra rail staff were there on hand to congratulate the driver who responded in a gracious way.

As we approached Macarthur Station, our guard communicated over the speaker system that those passengers continuing to the city should disembark at Macarthur station as on-going passengers would find it much easier than disembarking at Campbelltown.

Back in the fifties, the then Railway Commissioner Reg Windsor claimed that the “Rail Way was the Safe Way”.

These days we could also say … “The Rail Way was the Friendly Way.”

Richard Ruhfus

Bowral

Thank you

I WOULD like to say thank you to the kind woman at Moss Vale IGA who paid for my shopping on Monday morning when I forgot my purse while out with my baby.

I was very touched by her generosity and hope to have the opportunity to show the same kindness to another one day.

Thank you

Beth Atkins

Willow Vale

Gratitude is good

CHURCHES occasionally hold special thanksgiving services, but regardless of people’s religious affiliations, or lack of them, many people see it as important for their well-being to express gratitude for blessings.

In our modern society, the word “blessings” is under-used.

When something good happens, it is much more common to hear someone say, “that was good luck” than to say “that’s a blessing”.

On the surface, these two responses might appear interchangeable, but there’s a big difference between them.

Luck is, by definition, notoriously unreliable, whereas the notion of blessing is based on the existence of a constant, dependable source of good – in the same way as the principle of mathematics is always available and reliable for anyone to apply.

As a young newly-wed living in London, I began to suffer from homesickness, loneliness and depression.

I was in an English-speaking country, yet so many things felt foreign.

I had a loving husband, a good job and was beginning to make new friends, but the negative feelings were overwhelming.

When I began analysing these feelings, I realised I had succumbed to self-pity and loneliness because I missed my parents.

Then came the thought that they hadn’t stopped loving me, just because I was 12,000 miles away.

Love couldn’t be restricted to any place or person and, like the principle of mathematics, had to be right there where I was, as well as where my parents were.

The feeling of gratitude at this realisation swept away the gloom and allowed me to experience the good that had always been there – but note that the gratitude came first.

I came to understand why Mary Baker Eddy, writing over 150 years ago in her seminal book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, defined God as “the divine principle, love”, a reliable source of good to everyone, everywhere.

In other words, gratitude is good – for us!

That is why I will be attending my church’s annual thanksgiving service.

You will be very welcome too if you would like to join us at the Christian Science Church, corner of Bowral and Bendooley Sts, on Thursday, November 27 at 11am.

Judith Mee

Clerk, First Church of Christ, Scientist, Bowral

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Dodging bullets

Monday, 16 September, 2019

Sue Flannery and caretaker of her grandfather’s war memorabilia Trevor Brooker and the Dutch bibleTrevor Brooker is big on history and war memorabilia so when he was given a Dutch bible from the Boar War he was thrilled.
Nanjing Night Net

The book belonged to Sue Flannery’s grandfather Robert Scobie who was killed, along with 2000 other Australians, at Lone Pine during the First World War.

It is 100mm thick (four inches in the old scale) and is very ornate and held closed by two locks.

“The interesting thing about the book is that there are two bullet holes though it,” Trevor said.

The two very visible bullet holes

“It was kept in a saddlebag which also had the same bullet holes through the front.

“I believe the book was a souvenir from the Boar War which went from 1899 to 1902 where Robert fought.”

Scobie saw active service as an officer commanding B Company 4th Infrantry Regiment in the war and was promoted to captain.

Robert Scobie

The bible, written in Dutch, is a combination of the old and new testaments and was published on January 28, 1851.

The book, along with numerous other war memorabilia, will be donated to the Dungog Historical Society to be displayed in the museum for their World War 1 centenary display next year.

The Scobie brothers – Jim, Jack, Robert and Tom

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Barossa and Light cricket

Monday, 16 September, 2019

A ferocious spell by young Angaston speedster Ben Antonie saw him collect three of the last four South Gawler wickets to fall early on day two of a rain-shortened match.
Nanjing Night Net

RUNS: Angaston’s Shaun Woodards plays a leg glance on his way to a top score of 58 to help his side to a win over South Gawler.

The Lions added just 12 runs to its day one total before the Blues hit their way to 194 with Shaun Woodards (58), Scott Rathjen (30) and Ben Burgess (38) doing the bulk of the work.

Patrick White was the best of the Lions bowlers taking 4/31 before the Lions snuck in six overs of big hitting practice on their way to 2/50 with their captain Brodie Barker exploding for 28 not out.

After finishing day one on a solid 4/100, Kapunda tumbled to 8/142 by the end of their 58 overs as Gilbert Valley wrested the momentum from the Bombers.

Kym Vandeleur continued his hot form with a 45-run knock to pace the Bulls to 130 but it wasn’t enough to get them over the line.

A strong effort by Rob Johnson 5/54 (including the key wicket of Vandeleur) helped drag the Bombers to victory.

In A1 reserves, a telling 83-run innings by Richard Mattner carried Light Pass (5/180 to a win over Eudunda/Robertstown (9/169).

BEST: South Gawler’s Patrick White in action against Angaston. He finished with 4/38 but it wasn’t enough to grab a South win.

In A2, Angaston (6/183) held off Tanunda (125).

Jayden Antonie (40) and Matt Blenkiron (57 not out) set the Blues on course for victory last week before Blenkiron (3/52) and Ben Klemm (3/28) finished the job.

After restricting Nuriootpa to just 8/118 from 50 overs in A3, an even batting card saw Light Pass comfortably amass 135 thanks to Marty Gallasch (26), Steven Gallasch (32) and Karl Nitschke (28).

After being sent back to familiar territory after his cracking 154 not out a few weeks ago Andrew Nash, batting at nine chipped in with 28.

Gilbert Valley (5/206) outlasted Kapunda (176) despite Corey Ryan nailing 64 runs along with Danny Menzel (46) but yet another duck from Kym Jarman late in the innings cost the Bombers dearly.

A 50 from team captain Craig Hadden has certainly helped his very young Angaston side (141) outlast Gilbert Valley at Riverton in A4.

A grade

Freeling 6/110 (S S Carmichael 37, D J Miller 2/8) drew with Gawler Central.

Angaston 194 (S J Woodards 58, B S Burgess 38, S Rathjen 30; P G White 4/38) def South Gawler 122 (M J Trzeciak 30; B P Woodards 4/19, B Antonie 4/31) and 2/50 (B N Barker 28*).

Nuriootpa drew with Sandy Creek 8/93 ( T Jungfer 5/56, D S Doecke 3/36).

Gilbert Valley 130 (K Vandeleur 45; R Johnson 5/56, S Ryan 2/18) def by Kapunda 8/142 (M Johnson 39, C Reimann 28, R Johnson 28; J Connell 5/51, J Vater 2/35).

A1 Reserves

Lyndoch 8/262 (B R Tanti 103, B Williams 74; B Smith 4/67, R Giles 3/51) drew with Truro.

Light Pass 5/180 (R Mattner 83, W Gripton 41; C Reese 2/17) def Eudunda-Robertstown 9/169 (J R Mosey 56, B Biscan-Launer 37, M Wilksch 33,S R Nietschke 28; S Davies 4/20, B K Norman 3/34).

Tanunda 3/124 (J Justin 70*, B Grocke 29) drew with Mallala.

Greenock had the bye.

A2

Gawler Central drew with Freeling 7/82 (J Wright 37; J King 4/21).

South Gawler had the bye.

Sandy Creek 5/161 (R C Handtke 51, S Doolan 45, A J Wallwork 30, C Robinson 28; G B Swyghuizen 2/7, R Worrall 2/12) drew with Nuriootpa.

Angaston 6/183 (M J Blenkiron 57*, J Antonie 40, B J Klemm 31*; S Dunn 2/32) def Tanunda 125 (P Graetz 35, N G Justin 25; B J Klemm 3/28, M J Blenkiron 3/52, B Sibley 2/19).

A3

Gawler Central drew with Lyndoch 6/222 (C Kinlock 126, H Klose 48; K Nicholls 3/24, K P Norton 2/42).

Greenock had the bye.

Nuriootpa 8/118 (C W Dahms 32, S Moore 27; T Rowbottom 2/5) def by Light Pass 135 (S Gallasch 32, A Nash 28, K Nitschke 28, M Gallasch 26; R Haines 2/3, S Bell 2/19, H Loveridge 2/22, T Martin 2/31).

Kapunda 176 (C Ryan 64, D Menzel 46, T Sires 29; A Bruce 6/34) def by Gilbert Valley 5/206 (L Molineux 63, R J Schwartz 37, B Good 34*, J M Vater 32*; K Jarman 3/66, C Darke 2/23).

A4

Sandy Creek drew with Freeling.

Kapunda had the bye.

Mallala drew with Tanunda.

Gilbert Valley 108 (R McInerney 41; M J Lightburn 3/12, W Richardson 3/24) def by Angaston 141 (C Hadden 50; Z Hier 4/19, N R Bruce 4/33).

South Gawler drew with Lyndoch.

A5

Truro def by Greenock.

Tanunda 114 (J B Marshall 35; J Jaeger 4/16, M Smith 2/4, D Sutherland 2/30) def by Morgan

4/118 (T Purshe 51, J Jaeger 28*; C Collins 2/24).

Eudunda-Robertstown 50 (A Boucaut 4/14, L Bourne 3/13, D Sparks 2/7) def by Light Pass 5/52 (B Ellbourn 33*; P Kastelyn 3/23).

Under 16

Nuriootpa drew with Tanunda

4/148 (J Madden 79, C Hean 40).

Greenock/Angaston 4/161 (L Peel 41*, R Bourne 31, C Noack 25) drew with Lyndoch 1/15.

Gilbert Valley 79 (C Behn 37; R Robinson 3/10, J Hamilton 3/17, B Lane 2/0) def by Gawler Central 136 (C Slate 26, J Billing 26, J Hamilton 25; R Bruce 2/5, D Willmott 2/11, L H Reichelt 2/33).

South Gawler 7/136 (J A Connelly 40, J A Korber 36, B Judd Smith 25; D Grosser 2/10) drew with Kapunda/Eud/Rob.

Under 14

Lyndoch drew with Sandy Creek Gold 139 (J Riggs 34, J V Harrowfield 28; B Ramsey 3/20, M Prentice 2/8, E Lees 2/8, J J Longo 2/15).

Sandy Creek Green 4/219 (E Morrow 50*, T C Lane 29, A Goodman 27*) drew with Nuriootpa.

Gawler Central 9/101 drew with Greenock/Freeling.

Greenock drew with Gilbert Valley

171 (H McCabe 43, Z McCabe 32; M Harvey 2/12, J A Fowler 2/18).

Tanunda White 109 (N C Mills 37, R Westbrook 27; D Hunter 2/11, L Schutz 2/25) drew with Light Pass.

Angaston drew with Eudunda-Rob/Kapunda 83 (J Roesler 2/5, H Clarkson 2/8, J Clarkson 2/12).

Tanunda Black had a bye.

Under 12

Kapunda v Nuriootpa.

Eudunda-Robertstown 10/86 def by Light Pass 4/95 ( T Mosey 2/2).

Greenock v Sandy Creek Gold.

Angaston v Gilbert Valley Maroon.

Tanunda v Lyndoch.

Gilbert Valley Blue v South Gawler.

Mallala v Gawler Central.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Intersection named Esperance’s most dangerous

Monday, 16 September, 2019

Risky road: The intersection of Pink Lake Road and Harbour Road has been labelled the most dangerous in Esperance.THE difficulty in crossing Harbour Road to get to Pink Lake Road is just one of the reasons the intersection has been labelled Esperance’s most dangerous road.
Nanjing Night Net

According to a survey into Western Australia’s riskiest roads, the intersection of Pink Lake Road and Harbour Road has been named as the area’s most dangerous but many people have now questioned whether it is the roads or the drivers that are to blame for making the roads unsafe.

The RAC released its results from its 2014 Risky Roads campaign, which identifies the community’s views on the state’s most dangerous regional roads.

According to the risky roads survey results the reason the intersection was named the most dangerous was because of the difficulty in crossing Harbour Road to get to Pink Lake Road and the difficulty in joining high speed traffic.

Traffic lights were suggested as a way to improve safety at the intersection, according to the results.

However, the site was just one of many that Esperance residents deemed as dangerous.

The Esperance Express asked readers which roads or intersections were the most dangerous in Esperance and out of the 33 responses that were received, seven highlighted the Pink Lake and Harbour Road intersection as Esperance’s most dangerous.

Other dangerous spots raised by members of the public included Easton Road due to the lack of street lighting, Smith Street because of the no right turn, Mungan Street and Harbour Road due to fences blocking drivers’ sight lines in both directions, Arthur Street at the roundabout end because no one stopped to give way and the top of Arthur Street and Easton Road because drivers couldn’t see the vehicles entering the roundabout due to a hedge which blocks the view of drivers.

But some locals questioned whether there were any unsafe roads at all.

“Is it the roads or the drivers that are the problem?” one Facebook user wrote while another said “I haven’t seen any unsafe roads, just unsafe drivers”.

Police agreed.

Senior Sergeant Richard Moore did not think traffic lights would alleviate the problem and said drivers needed to follow the road rules, drive to the conditions and be patient.

Snr Sgt Moore said police had seen, on many occasions, drivers failing to come to a halt at stop signs at the intersection and he believed drivers would continue to flout the road rules even if traffic lights were introduced.

He said whether it was give way or stop signs or traffic lights, some drivers would ignore the warnings.

“We know that people don’t stop at stop signs,” Snr Sgt Moore said.

Meanwhile, Snr Sgt Moore warned drivers flouting the road rules would be caught and would be issued with infringement notices from police.

Do you think this is the most dangerous road in Esperance? Do you think traffic lights are the answer? Let us know. Comment below or email [email protected]南京夜网.au

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Gearing up for Grunwald

Friday, 16 August, 2019

Ash Grunwald will play Dunsborough in January.THE Mail had a chat to Ash Grunwald while he was in the process of recording in studio for his seventh album.
Nanjing Night Net

Taking a short break from his recording session, Grunwald picked up the phone to be immediately asked about whether or not he felt there was added pressure to his new album due to the outstanding success of his last few.

“There’s pressure in my process, I tell you that,” Grunwald said.

He went on to recount how making a new album was like a double edged sword when it was based on past work, as the bar is raised for his expectations of himself and his music.

“You never want to go backwards.” Grunwald said.

“I’ve lost count of the times I’ve said this has got to be the best album I’ve ever made.”

With time passing and no signs of slowing down, Grunwald said it was funny to reflect back on how ones career progresses.

“How can you stop that clock and in a lot of ways, why would you want to?”

A symbol of his career according to Grunwald is the size of his merchandise table, with his first gig having one CD for sale.

“My merch table is now full,” Grunwald said.

“I remember doing a support for Jeff Lang thinking I would be so proud to have a variety of albums like his,

“I would love to keep the creative fire burning to have that happen,

“Keep restless creatively.”

The opportunities music has provided Grunwald have not gone unnoticed, particularly in terms of having his family along for the ride.

“I didn’t have a stamp in my passport until I started touring,” Grunwald said.

His young daughter however has already seen a lot of the world with many stamps to her name, thanks to the success of Grunwald’s career.

Grunwald also said he couldn’t wait to see how the memories of these trips would work for his daughter, as from the four or five photos he had from childhood trips, the youth of today had thousands of photos at the touch of their fingertips.

Grunwald went on to say that the things that excited him the most about his musical career were the things that he didn’t see coming.

“Music is very funny on your ego,” Grunwald said.

When my song got on Limitless, I was shocked and that was amazing.”

Grunwald is also no stranger to the waves of the South West, being a keen surfer for the most of his life.

“It’s a strange Hawaii,” Grunwald said.

“The waves are massive.”

Grunwald once spent two weeks surfing in Prevelly, riding six to 10 foot waves where he felt the more he conquered the waves routinely, the greater sized waves he could achieve.

“You get conditioned,” Grunwald said.

Grunwald will play on January 11 at Clancy’s Fish Pub Dunsborough.

Tickets are available online through the venue.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Orange’s Wilson appointed 2015 Netball World Cup ambassador

Friday, 16 August, 2019

TALKING POINT: Orange’s Peter Wilson has been appointed our local ambassador for the 2015 Netball World Cup. Photo: MICHELLE COOK 1124mcpeter1PETER Wilson will be Orange’s link to the 2015 Netball World Cup.
Nanjing Night Net

The Orange Netball Association registrar has been awarded the position of World Cup ambassador for Orange for next year’s major event.

Wilson was told of his selection on Friday and he couldn’t be happier.

“I thought I’d throw my hat into the ring. I got an email on Friday saying they’d chosen me to be the Orange ambassador,” Wilson explained.

“I’m pretty chuffed. It’s great for Australia and NSW to have the World Cup on our doorstep. I just thought it was a good opportunity.”

He is still to be told of the finer details of his role, but said it is expected to officially start in February next year.

“My understanding is we have to promote the World Cup in our local area, not only to the netball community but to others as well. We need to keep people up to date with what’s happening,” he said.

Wilson said his passion for netball made him apply for the position.

“It’s an opportunity that doesn’t come around too often,” he said.

“I figure you only get out of it what you put in.”

Wilson has actually been assigned two World Cup positions.

He and wife Sally, a long-standing representative coach in Orange netball, have been offered positions as volunteers.

“So I think the ambassador role will be in the lead-up and then we’ll head off to Sydney to work down there,” Peter explained.

“We’ve been to Netball NSW meetings in Sydney and there have been discussions about the last World Cup which was in Australia in about 1991. Some of the people at those meetings were volunteers then and said it was wonderful.”

The 2015 Netball World Cup will run from August 7-16 in Sydney and feature 16 teams including hosts Australia.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Intersection named Esperance’s most dangerous

Friday, 16 August, 2019

Risky road: The intersection of Pink Lake Road and Harbour Road has been labelled the most dangerous in Esperance.THE difficulty in crossing Harbour Road to get to Pink Lake Road is just one of the reasons the intersection has been labelled Esperance’s most dangerous road.
Nanjing Night Net

According to a survey into Western Australia’s riskiest roads, the intersection of Pink Lake Road and Harbour Road has been named as the area’s most dangerous but many people have now questioned whether it is the roads or the drivers that are to blame for making the roads unsafe.

The RAC released its results from its 2014 Risky Roads campaign, which identifies the community’s views on the state’s most dangerous regional roads.

According to the risky roads survey results the reason the intersection was named the most dangerous was because of the difficulty in crossing Harbour Road to get to Pink Lake Road and the difficulty in joining high speed traffic.

Traffic lights were suggested as a way to improve safety at the intersection, according to the results.

However, the site was just one of many that Esperance residents deemed as dangerous.

The Esperance Express asked readers which roads or intersections were the most dangerous in Esperance and out of the 33 responses that were received, seven highlighted the Pink Lake and Harbour Road intersection as Esperance’s most dangerous.

Other dangerous spots raised by members of the public included Easton Road due to the lack of street lighting, Smith Street because of the no right turn, Mungan Street and Harbour Road due to fences blocking drivers’ sight lines in both directions, Arthur Street at the roundabout end because no one stopped to give way and the top of Arthur Street and Easton Road because drivers couldn’t see the vehicles entering the roundabout due to a hedge which blocks the view of drivers.

But some locals questioned whether there were any unsafe roads at all.

“Is it the roads or the drivers that are the problem?” one Facebook user wrote while another said “I haven’t seen any unsafe roads, just unsafe drivers”.

Police agreed.

Senior Sergeant Richard Moore did not think traffic lights would alleviate the problem and said drivers needed to follow the road rules, drive to the conditions and be patient.

Snr Sgt Moore said police had seen, on many occasions, drivers failing to come to a halt at stop signs at the intersection and he believed drivers would continue to flout the road rules even if traffic lights were introduced.

He said whether it was give way or stop signs or traffic lights, some drivers would ignore the warnings.

“We know that people don’t stop at stop signs,” Snr Sgt Moore said.

Meanwhile, Snr Sgt Moore warned drivers flouting the road rules would be caught and would be issued with infringement notices from police.

Do you think this is the most dangerous road in Esperance? Do you think traffic lights are the answer? Let us know. Comment below or email [email protected]南京夜网.au

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Tony Abbott’s ABC cuts just another backflip

Friday, 16 August, 2019

This past week there have been two glaring examples of the Abbott government going back on its word.
Nanjing Night Net

The first was a clear broken election promise not to cut ABC and SBS funding, which, very damaging though they will be to both organisations, seem to be driven by an anti-public broadcasting ideology rather than economic sense, given that the dollar amounts are proportionally not significant in the big picture of the Abbott/Hockey phantom budget crisis.

Though some National Party MPs have spoken out against these cuts, Michael McCormack, at the time of writing, has been silent on the issue.

Your colleagues know the importance of the ABC to regional and rural Australia.

Don’t you?

However, disturbed though I am by the prospect of getting my news and public affairs commentary via Rupert Murdoch and his ilk, this week I also want to comment on something else equally disturbing, which is the news that Australia has taken its stand against boat arrivals to a new level, saying it will no longer resettle asylum seekers found to be refugees by the United Nation’s refugee agency in Indonesia who registered after July 1.

There are also rumours that the decision could be wider than this (SMH, 20 November), and may be applied to all asylum seekers found to be genuine refugees recommended by UNHCR in transit countries such as Syria, Iran, Malaysia and Iraq.

But human rights advocates were appalled at the decision, questioning the real motives behind it. Refugee Council of Australia chief executive Paul Power said the decision was “absolutely outrageous.”

“This will put Indonesia under even more pressure,” he said.

It is understood Labor will be seeking answers and clarification on the impacts of the decision, whileGreens spokeswoman Sarah Hanson-Young, ever a gutsy spokesperson for the rights of refugees, said the decision was “narrow-minded” and “hard-hearted”.

“This is the exact opposite of what the government should be doing,” she said.

“We should be working with our neighbours, accelerating refugee processing and increasing Australia’s intake from the region so that people are given a safe way to reach protection. That’s the only way we can save lives at sea while caring for refugees.”

Elaine Pearson from Human Rights Watch said: “If Australia really cared about saving lives at sea, then it would take more people from Indonesia, not less, because it would want to prevent people taking perilous boat journeys.”

What really troubles me is that for many years the Liberal/Nationals coalition has been arguing that asylum seekers who have got as far an Indonesia should “join the queue” and apply for UN refugee status.

Now Captain Abbott’s team is contradicting itself by cutting off even this tenuous lifeline.

And to compound their sin, surely they are as aware as the rest of us, that there are no UN refugee offices in places where most of the asylum seekers are fleeing from, such as Afghanistan and Iraq.

Pull the other one, Mr Morrison.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Your Stars – 26.11.14

Friday, 16 August, 2019

ARIES: Life is just so exciting at the moment and November 26-28 simply highlight this trend. You’ll thoroughly enjoy the new opportunities that come your way then; a stroke of good fortune is uplifting.
Nanjing Night Net

TAURUS: Taurean natives tend to be unsettled by their life direction, career path or interaction with an authority figure of late. However, November 26-28 allow you to have the last laugh.

GEMINI: There does not seem to be any great time depth to your goals during November 26-28, but you don’t particularly care. Gemini is out there trying different routes to success and enjoying the experience.

CANCER: Your life has taken you on paths you may not have expected of late and you need to be adaptable to achieve the best from these experiences. November 26-28 help you do so.

LEO: Your mind is fascinated by the newness of life, differing viewpoints and technical information during November 26-28. Someone in particular totally inspires you as you take this journey.

VIRGO: Virgo natives are likely to be reviewing both work and health routines during November 26-28, as a piece of information catches your attention. New understandings are reached.

LIBRA: Life is anything but normal during November 26-28, with many Librans being caught up in an exciting new relationship or business partnership. Your instincts seem to tell you this is right.

SCORPIO: Whatever Scorpio is doing during November 26-28 are just so interesting, whether you are working, attending to domestic chores or investigating health interests.

SAGITTARIUS: Sagittarius is just not interested in old boring routines and ways during November 26-28: it’s time to live. Unexpected news connected to a child or romance gets you going.

CAPRICORN: You have an excellent opportunity to manage domestic budgets and expenses during November 26-28, even though you weren’t expecting to do so. Sudden developments are likely.

AQUARIUS: Spur of the moment activities seem to fill your daily schedules during November 26-28, making for vibrant experiences. Unexpected news also comes your way.

PISCES: There seems to be extra money in your pocked during November 26-28, providing an unexpected delight for Pisces. There’s a tendency to buy on impulse then but you should think things through first.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.